Namadgi National Park

Namadgi is the Aboriginal word for the mountains southwest of Canberra. The park is 105,900 hectares, making up more than half of the Australian Capital Territory. Namadgi was declared in 1984 protecting all animals, plants and cultural sites. The north-west section of the park lies just to the south of Canberra's outlying suburbs. To the south-west, the park joins Kosciuszko National Park and the Bimberi and Scabby Range nature reserves with Brindabella National Park on the north-eastern border.

 

Plants and Animals

 

Namadgi has a wide variety of plants and animals in habitats ranging from the broad grassy valleys to the snow gum woodlands. Even along a short walk, vegetation and wildlife can change dramatically.

 

Human history

 

The central Namadgi ranges, distinguished by their bold outcrops of granite, are of great importance to Aboriginal people. The first pastoralists settled in the broad valleys in the southern end of the park in the 1830s.

 

Wilderness Water

 

The Cotter River, its headwaters part of the Bimberi Wilderness, delivers a high quality water supply to Canberra. Subalpine bogs of sphagnum moss are particularly important because they purify water and continue to release it slowly even in times of drought.

 

Enjoying the snow

 

Snow can fall over any part of the park but is most common on the Bimberi and Brindabella Ranges. In winter the Mt Franklin Road is open as far as snow conditions permit and the areas beyond are good for cross-country skiing. There are no facilities for downhill skiing. The Brindabella and Mt Franklin Roads can be hazardous in winter and care should be taken as help is not always available for cars which run into trouble. Chains may be required.

 

Scenic Driving

 

Public roads within the park pass through majestic mountain country. The unsealed roads are narrow and can be slippery when wet or frosty. Roads may be closed because of snow, floods, and Total Fire Bans. Petrol is available in Canberra, Tharwa and Adaminaby, but not in the park.

 

Bushwalking

 

Much of Namadgi's beauty lies beyond its main roads and picnic areas. Well-prepared walkers who ventre into remote parts of Namadgi reap some of the parks's greatest rewards. All remote area parties should record the details of their trip into the bushwalking registers located at the visitor centre and elsewhere in the park.

 

Warm and waterproof clothing are always requred as mountain weather can change unexpectedly at any time of year. Walking off marked tracks requires expertise with map and compass. Camping restrictions apply in the Cotter River Catchment. Camping is prohibited in the lower and middle portions of the catchment, camping is by permit only in the upper catchment.

 

In Namadgi National Park:

 

Domestic pets are prohibited because they disturb native animals and other park visitors.

 

There are no bins, please remove all rubbish from the park.

 

Motorised vehicles are not permitted beyond public roads and carparks.

 

Leave animals, plants, rocks and wood where you find them; each has its place in the delicate balance of nature.

 

More information about Namadgi National Park

 

Namadgi Visitor Centre
Naas Road (two kilometres past Tharwa), ACT Phone: +61 2 6207 2900

 

Namadgi National Park is the most northern of theAustralian Alps national parks. Campgrounds, picnic areas and a variety of long and short walks all provide wonderful opportunities for visitors to explore this beautiful national park.

 

Being at the northern-most reaches of the alpine environment, Namadgi National Park is the crossroads for a range of plant communities from alpine, inland tablelands and coastal environments.

 

The Australian Alps

 

The Australian Alps are like a tiny island in a vast ocean. Alpine environments cover only 0.15% of the Australian continent. Fed by snowmelt from Australia's highest mountains, the continent's major rivers are born. Here, there are plants and animals found nowhere else.

 

To ensure the best management for the Alps, park agencies in New South Wales, Victoria, the Australian Capital Territory and the Commonwealth Government work together to manage 1.6 million hectares of the alpine region.

 

Escape in the Bimberi Wilderness

 

Surrounding Bimberi Peak, the Bimberi Wilderness spills over the border into the New South Wales from Namadgi to include some of the Alps' most beautiful scenery. You can easily view this rugged area from Mt Ginini or the Yerrabi Walking Track.

 

Wild things

 

Variety is the spice of life and there's no shortage of diversity in Namdagi's wildlife. Habitats range from the broad, grassy plains in the valleys to snowgum woodlands and alpine meadows on the mountain peaks. Within a short walk, vegetation and wildlife can change dramatically. To find out more call into the Namadgi Visitor Centre.

 

Namadgi and people

 

Mountains in Namadgi National Park, distinguished by their bold outcrops of granite, are of great importance to the local Aboriginal people. There are many clues to Aboriginal lifestyles throughout the park. These include stone tools, quarry sites, stone arrangements and rock art. Today the Aboriginal people retain a strong link with Namadgi.

 

You will discover numerous reminders of previous European occupants including pastoralists, ski clubs, foresters and even space industry workers.

 

Mountains of water

 

The Cotter River catchment in Namdagi supplies 85% of Canberra's and Queanbeyan's water. This high quality mountain water, filtered and purified by subalpine bogs of sphagnum moss, is continually released slowly even in times of drought.

 

Enjoying the snow

 

Snow can fall over any part of the Park but is most common on the Bimberi and Brindabella Ranges. In winter the Mt Franklin Road is open as far as snow conditions permit and the area beyond is good for cross-country skiing. The Brindabella and Mt Franklin Roads can be hazardous in winter and care should be taken, as help is not always available when cars run into trouble. Chains may be required.

 

Bushwalking

 

Much of Namadgi's beauty lies beyond its main roads and picnic areas. Notes on the Park's 160km of marked walking tracks can be found in the Namadgi National Park ' Map and Guide'.

 

Walking off marked tracks

 

Well-prepared walkers who venture into remote parts of Namadgi reap some of the park's greatest rewards. All remote area parties should record the details of their trip in the bushwalking registers located at the Visitor Centre and elsewhere in the Park. Please refer to the Namadgi Map and Guide brochure.

 

Warm and waterproof clothing is always required as mountain weather can change unexpectedly at any time of the year. Walking off marked tracks requires expertise with map and compass.

 

Camping restrictions apply in the Cotter River Catchment. Camping is prohibited in the lower and middle portions of the catchment; camping is by permit only in the upper catchment. Phone or drop into the Namadgi Visitor Centre.

 

Scenic driving

 

Public roads within the Park pass through majestic mountain country. The unsealed roads are narrow and can be slippery when wet or frosty. Roads may be closed because of snow, flood and Total Fire Bans. Petrol is available in Canberra, Tharwa and Adaminaby but not in the Park.

 

Campgrounds and picnic areas

 

Flushing toilets Composting/pit toilets Shelter Gas BBQs Wood BBQs Water - drinkable Streamwater - treat/boil Campervan sites (no electricity) Tent sites - large groups Tent sites - 6 or less people

 

Please note: Car-based camping is permitted only at the 3 campgrounds. A 3 night limit applies. Generators are not permitted in the park.

 

Advance bookings and fees apply to all Namadgi campgrounds. Phone the Visitor Centre on (02) 6207 2900.

 

Mountain biking

 

There are several hundred kilometres of scenic mountain trails to explore. Cycling is permitted on all fire trails other than those in the Bimberi Wilderness. Bicycles are not permitted off the fire trails. Walking tracks are for walkers only.

 

Fishing

 

All Namadgi streams other than the Upper Cotter River are classified as trout waters are subject to an open season, gear/bait restrictions and size/bag limits. Fishing is prohibited in the Cotter River catchment upstream from the Bendora Dam wall to protect water quality and uncommon species such as native blackfish and Macquarie perch. Detailed fishing regulations are available from fishing shops, the Namadgi Visitor Centre.

 

Horseriding

 

Horseriding is permitted on fire trails east of the Old Boboyan Road. The National Bicentennial Horse Trail passes through Namadgi on the Naas River Fire Trail. Before riding, contact the Namadgi Visitor Centre for information and to arrange access and use of yards and camping areas.

 

Namadgi map and guide

 

There is a colour map and guide on sale at camping stores and the Namadgi Visitor Centre. It includes a high quality 1:100,000 map showing roads, 22 walking tracks, fire trails, campgrounds and picnic grounds.

 

More Information

 

Namadgi National Park
Postal Address
RMB RMB 141 Tharwa ACT 2620
Phone (+61 02) 6207 2900 BH Facsimile (+61 02) 6207 2901

 

 

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