Dinden National Park

Dinden National Park straddles the Lamb Range. Rainforest cloaks the wetter eastern side of the range, where Lake Morris, the main water reservoir for Cairns, is situated. Eucalypt woodland occupies the drier rain-shadowed areas on the western slopes. Between these two contrasting vegetation types runs a strip of a rare forest type known as wet sclerophyll. Davies Creek Falls is a magnificent waterfall that cascades over huge granite boulders and is a feature of Davies Creek National Park.

 

A number of birds, such as the eastern yellow robin, the white-cheeked honeyeater and white-naped honeyeater are particularly fond of the wet sclerophyll forest of these two national parks. Endangered northern bettongs are also found in Davies Creek National Park and parts of Dinden National Park. These rat-kangaroos, smaller than a rabbit, are found only in very limited areas of north Queensland and nowhere else in the world. Researchers also recently discovered southern brown bandicoots residing in Davies Creek National Park — a long way from the nearest known population on the Cape York Peninsula.

 

Exploring Dinden:

 

Clohesy fig tree circuit walk — 600m (15 minutes) Grade: Easy

 

This wheelchair-accessible boardwalk encircles the magnificent Clohsey fig tree. Signs along the walk interpret the local rainforest environment.

 

Kahlpahlim Rock walking trail — 12km return (6–7 hours) Grade: Difficult

 

At around 1300m above sea level, Kahlpahlim Rock is the highest point on the Lamb Range, providing views over Lake Morris, Cairns and Davies Creek. The trail starts from a carpark on Davies Creek Road. It follows a former logging trail through rainforest with impressive kauri pines before entering casuarina and banksia forest. The sheer size of the rock and the views over the Davies Creek catchment are impressive. This steep but beautiful trail can be undertaken as a return walk along the original Kahlpahlim trail or as a circuit route returning via the ridge trail (located about 1km short of the summit) and Davies Creek Road. The trail is well marked with orange trail markers but should only be undertaken by fit and experienced walkers. The best time to visit is in the drier months between September and November. It is best to start the walk early, in the cool of the day. You will need to carry plenty of water and inform a reliable person of your plans. It is not advisable to start the walk when the top of the mountain is covered in cloud or after wet weather.

 

Turtle Rock circuit trail — 8km (3–4 hours) Grade: Difficult

 

This trail commences between campsites 3 and 4 in Dinden National Park. The trail follows Davies Creek for a short way before heading up a gradually steepening ridge to the 936m summit. Impressive boulders and spectacular views in all directions are features of this rough, steep trail. The trail continues over the summit and returns via a different ridge, to join up with the ascending trail nearer Davies Creek. It is a difficult trail that should only be undertaken by fit and experienced walkers. The best time to visit is in the drier months between September and November. It is best to start the walk early, in the cool of the day. You will need to carry plenty of water and inform a reliable person of your plans.

 

Getting there: Six campsites are situated in Dinden National Park, a further 5km along Davies Creek Road from Davies Creek National Park. The start of the Kahlpahlim Rock walking trail is past both campgrounds, 14.5km along Davies Creek Road. Visit only in the dry season (April — October). Four-wheel-drive vehicles are advisable for access to the campsites.

 

Further Information:

 

EPA Customer Service Centre

 

Ground Floor

 

160 Ann Street, Brisbane

 

PO Box 15155 CITY EAST QLD 4002

 

ph (07) 3227 8185

 

fax (07) 3227 8749

 

email csc@epa.qld.gov.au

 

 

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