Dularcha National Park and Mooloolah Forest Reserve

Getting there and getting around

 

From Brisbane, follow the Bruce Highway north, take the Glass House Mountains tourist drive turnoff and follow the signs to the Glass House Mountains. Glass House Mountains lookout is a great place to visit first for an orientation to the area.

 

Wheelchair accessibility
The toilets at Coochin Creek, Stony Creek, the Glass House Mountains lookout and the base of Mount Tibrogargan and Mount Beerwah are wheelchair-accessible. The walking tracks at Jowarra are wheelchair-accessible except in wet conditions when the unsealed tracks become difficult to traverse.

 

Park features

 

Glass House Mountains National Park
Craggy volcanic peaks tower over a scenic patchwork of pine plantations, bushland and cultivated fields. Many of the peaks are protected in Glass House Mountains National Park, while the pine plantations and a range of native vegetation types are managed in several State forests and forest reserves near the park.

 

Named by Cook during his epic voyage along Australia's east coast, the Glass Houses are rhyolite plugs formed by volcanic activity millions of years ago. Remnants of the open eucalypt woodland and heath vegetation, which once covered the coastal plains, provide a home for an interesting variety of animals and plants, including 26 rare and threatened plant species.

 

The Glass House Mountains area was a special meeting place where many Aboriginal people gathered for ceremonies and trading. This place is considered spiritually significant with many ceremonial sites still present and protected today.

 

Beerburrum and Beerwah State Forests and Forest Reserves
These extensive forests lie either side of the Bruce Highway and extend north from Caboolture to Caloundra, and from Pumicestone Passage west to Woodford. They include exotic pine plantations, open eucalypt forest, rainforest and coastal wallum remnants. Coochin Creek camping area is located in this forest, east of the Bruce Highway.

 

Bellthorpe State Forest and Forest Reserve
These forests are west of the Glass House Mountains, at the southern end of the Conondale Range. They are quite rugged with open eucalypt forest, rainforest, waterfalls and cascades along picturesque Stony Creek. Visitors can use forest tracks for walking but you need to be very well prepared and self-sufficient and be aware that mobile phone reception does not work in this area.

 

Dularcha National Park and Mooloolah Forest Reserve

 

A bat colony in an historic railway tunnel and some attractive bushland are protected within these parks, just north of Landsborough.

Camping and accommodation

 

Camping

 

There is a camping area and day use area at Coochin Creek (map reference 9). The facilities provided here include picnic tables, wheelchair-accessible toilets, tent sites and caravan sites. Coochin Creek is ideal for visitors who enjoy fishing and boating and a boat ramp is located near the camping area. Use insect repellent to deter mosquitoes and leeches.

 

You will need to bring your own fuel stove as open fires are not allowed.

 

To get to Coochin Creek, take the Roys Road turnoff east from the Bruce Highway and follow the signs. You can reach the camping area by conventional vehicle.

 

There are also private camping areas on the Glass House Mountains Road — see the tourism information links below for further information.

 

Other accommodation

 

A range of holiday accommodation is available in the Sunshine Coast hinterland. For more information see the tourism information links below.

 

Things to do

 

Picnic and day use areas

 

A beautiful place to stop and picnic is the Stony Creek day use area in Bellthorpe Forest Reserve (map reference 10). You’ll find a rugged landscape containing open forest and rainforest with many small waterfalls, creek cascades and a rock pool. For your safety, please do not jump or dive into the creek. There are toilets, picnic tables and wood barbecues. Bring your own clean-cut firewood. It is illegal to collect wood here. Dogs on leashes are allowed in this picnic area.

 

There are picnic tables, wheelchair-accessible toilets and gas barbecues at Coochin Creek (map reference 9).

 

There are picnic tables and toilets at the bases of Mount Beerwah and Mount Tibrogargan. Glass House Mountains lookout also has wood barbecues. Bring your own clean-cut firewood. It is illegal to collect wood here. These areas are described in more detail below.

 

Walking

 

The Glass House Mountains offer some spectacular walking tracks through open woodlands and heaths to panoramic lookouts and mountain summits. The walks range from easy to challenging grades.

 

Key to track standards
Class 2 track (Australian Standards)
>>Easy level track, suitable for all fitness levels.
Class 3 track (Australian Standards)
>>Gently sloping, well-defined track with slight inclines or few steps.
>>Caution needed on loose gravel surfaces and exposed natural lookouts.
>>Reasonable level of fitness and ankle-supporting footwear required.
Class 4 track (Australian Standards)
>>Distinct track usually with steep exposed inclines or many steps.
>>Caution needed on loose gravel surfaces and exposed natural lookouts.
>>Moderate level of fitness and ankle-supporting footwear required.
Class 5 track (Australian Standards)
>>Steep track with irregular surface and loose stones.
>>Considerable exposure to the elements may be experienced.
>>High level of physical fitness and flexible-soled shoes with good grip required.

 

Track descriptions

 

(1) Glass House Mountains Lookout track — 800m return (Allow 30 minutes) Class 3
The lookout is about 10km from Glass House Mountains township, in Beerburrum State Forest. It offers panoramic views of the mountain peaks, Caloundra, Maroochydore, Brisbane and Moreton Island. A short walking track starting at the lookout leads you through open scribbly gum forest, down through a wet eucalypt forest gully and returns back to the lookout. There are picnic tables, toilets and wood barbecues at the start of the track.

 

(2) Mount Beerburrum (278m) — 1.4km return (Allow 1 hour) Class 3
The carpark is just outside Beerburrum township, in Beerburrum State Forest. This steep, paved track leads you to a fire tower which offers great views. Mount Beerburrum's fire tower is used to detect and manage fires throughout the surrounding parks and forests.

 

(3) Wild Horse Mountain lookout (123m) — 1.4km return (Allow 1 hour) Class 3
The lookout is in Beerburrum State Forest, east of the Bruce Highway. Turn off at the Mobil Service Station and drive along Johnston Rd to the lookout. Named after the brumbies (wild horses) that once lived there, Wild Horse Mountain offers a paved track to the lookout from the carpark. Enjoy 360-degree views of Pumicestone Passage, coastal plains, the Glass House Mountains and forestry plantations from the sheltered fire tower platform.

 

(4) Mount Ngungun (253m above sea level) — 2.4km return (Allow 2 hours) Class 4
Glass House Mountains track maps (coming soon)
Mount Ngungun is about 3km from Glass House Mountains township via Coonowrin and Fullertons Roads. This summit provides spectacular views of all four major mountain peaks. The track starts at the carpark and is relatively short but steep in places and may be unstable in some sections. Family groups should be careful, as the track passes close to the cliff line. Adults should supervise children at all times. This track can become very slippery when wet.

 

(5) Mount Tibrogargan (364m above sea level)
Glass House Mountains track maps (coming soon)
Mount Tibrogargan is between Beerburrum and Glass House Mountains townships, off Marshs and Barrs Roads. There are picnic tables and toilets at the base of the mountain, near the carpark.

 

(a) Mountain View lookout — 800m return (Allow 40 minutes) Class 3
Beginning from the northern end of the Mount Tibrogargan carpark, this track leads up to a lookout with views over Mount Beerwah, Mount Coonowrin, Mount Tibberoowuccum and Mount Tunbubudla.

 

(b) Tibrogargan circuit — 3.3 km return. (Allow 1.5 hours) Class 3
This walking track leads around the base of Mount Tibrogargan through casuarina groves, open eucalypt and melaleuca forests. The track allows for great views of Mount Tibrogargan. Keep an eye out for circling peregrine falcons.

 

(c) Trachyte circuit — 5.6km return (Allow 2-3 hours) Class 4
This circuit leads through open woodland and heathland linking Mount Tibrogargan and Mount Tibberoowuccum. Interpretive signs along the track provide details of the area's special features. The Jack Ferris lookout, on Trachyte Ridge, allows for good views of the surrounding peaks. This ridge owes its name to a type of volcanic rock which forms many of the Glass House Mountains peaks.

 

(d) Mount Tibrogargan summit — 3km return (Allow 3-4 hours) Class 5
From Mountain View lookout, the track continues to the summit. A high level of physical fitness and rockclimbing skills are required. Allow time to return from the climb during daylight hours.

 

(6) Mount Beerwah (556m above sea level)
Glass House Mountains track maps (coming soon)
Mount Beerwah is about 9km from Glass House Mountains township via Coonowrin and Mount Beerwah roads. There are picnic tables and toilets at the base of the mountain, near the carpark.

 

(a) Cliff face lookout — 700m return (Allow 30 minutes) Class 3
This walk leads from the carpark to a lookout at the base of the mountain and offers great views of the surrounding hinterland.

 

(b) Western boundary walk — 1.4km return (Allow 45 minutes) Class 2
This walk leads from the picnic area to the western park boundary gate through open eucalypt forest.

 

(c) Mount Beerwah summit — 2.6km return (Allow 3–4 hours) Class 5
Mount Beerwah is the highest of the Glass House Mountain peaks. This steep and difficult walk requires a high level of fitness and bushwalking and rockclimbing experience. Allow time to return from the climb during daylight hours.

 

(7) Dularcha National Park tunnel track — 6km return (Allow 2 hours) Class 2

 

An interesting feature of this park, which is just north of Landsborough township, is its historic curved railway tunnel which was constructed in 1890, and is now home to many small nocturnal bats.

 

An option for this walk is to leave your car at the Landsborough railway station, catch a train to Mooloolah railway station and walk back through the national park to your car (about 5km, allow 2 hours).

 

Consult a local street directory as you will need to negotiate your way through urban streets surrounding the park. Turn into Paget St (northern entry) or Beech Road (southern entry) and you will see the national park sign. Toilets and picnic areas are located in nearby towns.

 

(8) Jowarra — Beerwah Forest Reserve

 

Access is via the Glass House Mountains Tourist Drive adjacent to the Caloundra turnoff. Situated on the banks of the Mooloolah River, this is one of the few remaining coastal rainforest areas in this region. It is an important home for wildlife including the wompoo pigeon, eastern yellow robin, and the vulnerable Richmond birdwing butterfly. There are picnic tables and toilets at the carpark.

 

Use insect repellent to deter mosquitoes and leeches.

 

(a) Mooloolah River Circuit — 500m return (Allow 20 minutes) Class 2
This short, self-guiding rainforest walk winds along a crystal clear creek. The fruiting fig trees here attract many birds and this is a good spot for birdwatching.

 

(b) Melaleuca walk — 1.3km return (Allow 40 minutes) Class 2
Rainforest with piccabeen palm groves, eucalypt forest and melaleuca swamp awaits those taking this longer walk. The river here is home to platypus, which can be seen at dawn and dusk.

 

Rockclimbing

 

For your safety
>>Never attempt any climb or abseil that you are not confident you can complete.
>>Always use appropriate equipment. Helmets are strongly recommended.
>>Allow enough time to climb in daylight hours.
>>Carry enough water and food for your climb.
>>Carry a mobile phone and keep emergency phone numbers.
>>Never climb alone.
>>Be aware of those below — be careful not to dislodge rocks when climbing
>>Watch the weather — if it looks like it will rain do not attempt the climb. Rocks will become slippery and dangerous.
>>Carry a first aid kit.

 

Mount Beerwah and Mount Tibrogargan summit access
Routes that lead to the summits have steep, rocky sections that require rock scrambling and some rock climbing skills. Never attempt these tracks in wet weather as the steep inclines can be slippery and dangerous. Flexible-soled shoes with good grip should be worn. See the Walking section for more details of these tracks.

 

Roped sports (abseiling and rockclimbing)
Artificial anchors at rock climbing sites have not been approved for use by the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service.

 

Mount Ngungun (253m above sea level)
This mountain provides opportunities for moderately challenging rock face climbing and abseiling for 20 to 45m roped sports. Equipment and expertise are required.

 

Mount Tibrogargan (364m above sea level)
This mountain provides opportunities for challenging and potentially dangerous rock face climbing. A high level of expertise and equipment is required.

 

Mount Beerwah (556m above sea level)
This mountain provides opportunities for challenging and potentially dangerous rock face climbing. A high level of expertise and equipment is required.

 

Danger:
Mount Coonowrin (377m above sea level) is closed to public access due to the danger of rock falls. The peak can be seen from roadsides in the local area.

 

Climate and weather

 

The Glass House Mountains area has a mild, subtropical climate. The average daily temperature range is 18 to 28 degrees Celsius in summer and 11 to 20 degrees Celsius in winter.

 

Opening hours
For your safety, walk in Glass House Mountains National Park in daylight hours only. For more information contact the park office

 

Further information
QPWS Maleny
61 Bunya Street, Maleny QLD 4552
ph (07) 5494 3983
fax (07) 5494 3986

 

QPWS Sunshine Coast District Office
Esplanade Parade, Cotton Tree QLD 4558
ph (07) 5459 6110
fax (07) 5443 8942

 

EPA Customer Service Centre
160 Ann Street, Brisbane
PO Box 15155, City East QLD 4002
ph (07) 3227 8185
fax (07) 3227 8749
For walking, wear suitable shoes, sunscreen, a hat and long-sleeved shirt. .

 

Information for this National Park has been supplied courtesy of Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service

 

 

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