Daintree National Park

Daintree National Park is a complex of long sandy beaches, rocky headlands and steep mountain ranges intersected by numerous creeks and rivers. One of Australia?s last extensive stands of lowland rainforest is found here. Impenetrable ranges, rising steeply from the coast, are blanketed with dense upland rainforests that support many ancient plants and animals. This unique landscape is the traditional country of the Kuku Yalanji.

 

Park features

 

Daintree National Park is a complex of long sandy beaches, rocky headlands and steep mountain ranges intersected by numerous creeks and rivers. One of Australia’s last extensive stands of lowland rainforest is found here. Impenetrable ranges, rising steeply from the coast, are blanketed with dense upland rainforests that support many ancient plants and animals. This unique landscape is the traditional country of the Kuku Yalanji.

 

The Cape Tribulation Section of Daintree National Park (approximately 17,000ha) stretches in a narrow, discontinuous strip from the Daintree River in the south to the Bloomfield River in the north. Rising steeply up from the coast, the McDowall Range forms the western boundary of the park.

 

A visit to this area gives you a rare chance to experience two of Australia’s most significant World Heritage sites – the Great Barrier Reef and the Wet Tropics World Heritage Areas. Both areas are valued for their exceptional biological diversity.

 

Camping

 

Noah Beach campground is situated 8km south of Cape Tribulation and has 17 campsites. It does not cater for caravans or larger campervans as they will not fit in the sites. The camping area may be closed after heavy rain and throughout the wet season. Fifty metres from the beach, it is beneath the forest canopy, giving protection from both the sea breeze and the harsh sun.

 

Walking

 

There are four short walks and one long, steep walk available within Cape Tribulation Section of Daintree National Park. The short walks range from 400m to 1200m. All short walks have a boardwalk component and, apart from Jindalba, are completely wheelchair accessible.

 

The long walk (Mt Sorrow Ridge Walk) is 7km return and starts from the coastal lowland rainforest valley of Cape Tribulation. The trail leads you up the open and windswept ridgeline of Mt Sorrow then ascends to a lookout at an elevation of 650m.

 

(1) Jindalba “foot of the mountain” – 650m loop (30 minutes) Grade: Easy
The boardwalk offers the chance to explore an excellent example of tropical lowland rainforest. Quiet walkers may be lucky enough to see a tree-kangaroo or a cassowary here. There is a large, quiet picnic area with toilets and tables. Wheelchair access to the creek is available from exit end only, near the disabled park bays.

 

(2) Marrdja “rainforest” or “jungle”– 1200m loop (45 minutes) Grade: Easy (Wheelchair accessible)
Visitors have the opportunity to walk in comfort on this boardwalk amongst a great variety of rainforest plants and to enjoy an excellent view of mangrove communities without getting muddy feet.

 

(3) Dubuji “place of spirits”– 1200m loop (45 minutes) Grade: Easy (Wheelchair accessible)
A boardwalk through lowland rainforest swamps and mangroves, complete with informative signs explaining the survival strategies used by rainforest plants and animals. The site is close to Myall beach and has large grassed areas with barbecues, picnic shelters and toilets.

 

(4) Kulki– 800m return (10 minutes) Grade: Easy (Wheelchair accessible)
Kulki visitor area at Cape Tribulation offers a boardwalk leading from the picnic area to a viewing platform overlooking the ocean and beach. A short walk from the Kulki car park takes you to beautiful Myall Beach. Toilets and picnic tables are provided.

 

(5) Mt Sorrow Ridge Walk – 7km return (6-7 hrs return) Grade: Difficult – above-average fitness required
Mt Sorrow Ridge Walk trail guide
The start of the marked trail is on the Bloomfield Road, 150m north of the turn off to the Kulki day use area. This is a steep and difficult walk. Walkers need to be fit, self-reliant and well-prepared. There is no water available along the trail and weather conditions can change rapidly. Walkers have been lost in this area so it is very important to keep to the trail and never walk alone. Do not attempt this walk in very hot and humid conditions or in wet or cloudy weather when the track becomes slippery and views are obscured. Inform someone at your accommodation house of your intentions and estimated time of return.

 

Guided tours and talks

 

Guided walks throughout Cape Tribulation Section of Daintree National Park are provided by commercial operators. Check with tourism information centres for further information prior to arrival.

 

Boating and fishing

 

Fishing is permitted in all creeks in Cape Tribulation Section of Daintree National Park except for Cooper Creek.

 

The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park lies adjacent to Cape Tribulation Section so various boating and fishing opportunities exist. For access to Snapper Island, the closest boat ramp is at the Daintree River. Check Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Zoning maps for restrictions on fishing activities.

 

Further Information

 

QPWS Cairns office
5B Sheridan St, Cairns
PO Box 2066, Cairns Qld 4870
ph (07) 4046 6600
fax (07) 4046 6751

 

 

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